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Launching your game or DLC on Twitter

Asset 1 4 min Best Practice

Creating a game or new DLC (downloadable content) is no easy feat and can typically take years to accomplish. That’s why it’s imperative that just as much consideration goes into your launch plan as the creation of your actual product. This means making sure you’ve got a thoroughly built-out marketing plan with Twitter in mind every step of the way. Think of the launch plan as a slow drip feed — that way your release is on potential customer’s minds frequently.

Here are six steps to help ensure your launch is a hit on Twitter.

Step 1: Begin the tease

Start by Tweeting out a simple image. Maybe it has no context and loosely relates to your game. Maybe it’s a logo and an announcement date. Think about how you want people to interpret this as this will be your audience’s first touchpoint with your game. Do you want them to immediately have all the information or do you want to slowly build up anticipation?

Step 2: Show it off

Today’s the big reveal. Release a first look at your upcoming game or DLC. If you use a live stream to do this, consider simulcasting the stream to Twitter. Share some key talking points or highlights using LiveCut in real time. Let people know the release date and don’t forget to tell them when they can expect the next wave of information.

Pro tip:

If you can, be sure to show actual gameplay along with your cinematic trailer (if you have one) during this reveal. Ultimately, people want to see what the gameplay experience will be like, rather than just a hyped-up trailer.

Step 3: Team up

If you’re partnering with content creators and influencers for your release, consider amplifying their Tweets organically, or boosting them in Ads Manager for wider reach. This is a great way to tap into other audiences that you normally wouldn’t be able to reach by yourself.

Pro tip:

Aligning your content plan with an influencer’s touchpoints on your new game or DLC is key. Think about how you can intertwine the two, so influencers are receiving information to amplify a big announcement or keep the conversation going between big announcements.

Repeat steps 2 and 3 as needed with every big announcement. For instance, showing off campaign and multiplayer content should be two separate events to maximize exposure and make sure things don’t get lost in the mix.

Step 4: Almost there

By now, most of the juicy parts of your game are out in the wild. But what about all the little details and features that people may have missed? Now is the time to talk up some of the maps a bit more in depth, how a player progresses through the game, or even post-launch plans to give your community a sense of what’s in store beyond launch day. Additionally, you can do a countdown stream the night of to build up maximum hype.

Step 5: The big day

This is what you’ve been working toward so don’t let up on the gas. Send out your announcement Tweet and then gather up reviews (either direct links or Tweets) and start Tweeting or Retweeting them. Drip feed them throughout the day. See a great piece of content? Share a link to it. If it’s with a creator or influencer, put spend behind the Tweet like you did for the reveal(s).

Step 6: Keep it going

Keep the conversation going by talking about the next DLC drop (if there is one) or sharing updates to the game. What are people talking about at launch? What’s the consensus on the meta in multiplayer? How are people approaching a particularly hard level in the game? If your game has a season, talk about what’s going on or what’s for grabs in that season. Create a montage of some great community clips.

Want to amplify your plan beyond your organic marketing plans? Consider putting additional spend into advertising on ads.twitter.com or reaching out to your Twitter account manager. There’s a reason why Twitter users are 53% more likely than the general online population to be the first to buy new products.¹

 

Source:
1. Kantar, “News Discovery & Influence on Twitter”, Global, December 2017. Monthly Twitter Global users (n=17,138), online global population (n= 34, 535)